How do doctors diagnose early-onset dementia?
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How do doctors diagnose early-onset dementia?

On Behalf of | Feb 11, 2022 | Social Security Disability |

At one time or another, virtually everyone has forgotten something. If you regularly overlook matters in your personal or professional life, though, it is advisable to talk to your doctor. After all, even if you are still in the prime of your life, you may have early-onset dementia.

According to the Alzheimer’s Association, early-onset dementia happens when a person develops dementia before the age of 65. If you have the condition, you may notice memory loss and other symptoms when you are as young as 30.

Symptoms of early-onset dementia

While early-onset dementia often comes with other symptoms, your first indication of the disease is likely to be cognitive decline. If you regularly struggle to do any of the following, you may be in the early stages of dementia:

  • Remember names, dates and facts
  • Solve problems
  • Multitask
  • Choose the right words

Often, individuals with early-onset dementia also experience personality changes. If your loved ones find you to be increasingly irritable, early-onset dementia may be to blame. This, of course, is especially true if your personality changes come with cognitive impairments.

Diagnostic options

If your primary care physician shares your concerns, you can expect him or her to refer you to a neurologist for further testing. Neurologists have a variety of diagnostic tools to determine whether you may have early-onset dementia. Here are some of them:

  • Brain scans
  • Brain imaging
  • Cognitive tests
  • Monitoring

Early-onset dementia is likely to interfere with your ability to work. Ultimately, because the condition usually qualifies for fast-tracking of Social Security Disability Insurance benefits, you may be eligible for financial compensation to help you make ends meet.

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