Bridgman Law Offices - Social Security Disability Lawyer

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How will my income affect my SSI payments?

Supplemental Security Income is a form of benefits paid by the Social Security Administration. In order to receive SSI a person must qualify either through blindness, age or disability. If a person makes too much money, then they may not be eligible to receive benefits through SSI.

A number of forms of income are considered by the Social Security Administration when a person applies for SSI benefits. Any traditional income that a person makes through doing a job will count toward their income, and so will forms of unearned income. These can include but are not limited to payments from pensions, payments of interest and dividends and benefits for unemployment and disability.

Additionally, any support that a person receives to help get by may be considered income when they apply for SSI. If a person is given a free place to live or has access to discounted or free food then those opportunities will be imputed as income in their SSI determination.

Finally, any income earned by individuals in the applicant’s household, such as their spouse or parents, may be considered when the Social Security Administration makes an SSI decision. All of these forms of income are put together and based on the applicant’s need they may or may not be awarded SSI benefits.

It is generally the rule that the more money a person has access to through their income, the less they will receive in SSI benefits. However, if an applicant for SSI believes that a mistake was made in the computation of their benefits, they can pursue an appeal of their determination. Disability benefits attorneys can help them with their legal struggles.

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